Intranasal Ketamine | 703-844-0184 | Fairfax, Va 22304 | Ketamine Treatment Center | Dr. Sendi | Ketamine for depression | Depression Treatment Center | CBD Doctor | Nasal Ketamine Provider | McLean, Va | Arlington, Va 22230 | 703-844-0184

Intranasal Ketamine for Treatment-Resistant Depression

Call 703-844-0184 For a Ketamine Treatment Evaluation | Fairfax, Va 22304

NOVA Health Recovery Ketamine Treatment Center

There is an urgent need for better medications that work quickly for treatment of major depression and bipolar disorder. The treatment should also be tolerable and work for depressed patients who have not responded to conventional treatments, ie, who have treatment-resistant depression (TRD).

Ketamine is a medication that is used intravenously for anesthesia, but multiple controlled trials have now demonstrated a rapid antidepressant response to a single intravenous infusion of ketamine. Controlled studies of regular infusions appear promising, but the need for regular IV infusions is not something that is appealing to most patients and often results in non-compliance. And, oral ketamine is extensive broken down by the liver before it can be absorbed by the body, so oral therapy is not a viable option. Therefore, the intranasal route has been investigated.

Intranasal drug delivery offers a route to the brain that bypasses problems related to gastrointestinal absorption, first-pass metabolism, and the blood-brain barrier; and the onset of therapeutic action is rapid. Intranasal medications avoid the inconvenience and discomfort of IV therapy. Intranasal medications have been used to treat migraine, acute and chronic pain, Parkinson’s disease, cognitive disorders, autism, schizophrenia, social phobia, and depression.

In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial conducted in 20 patients with major depression, physicians and researchers at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, tested the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of intranasal ketamine in patients with depression who had failed at least one prior antidepressant trial. The researchers found that a single intranasal dose of ketamine (50 mg) outperformed placebo; the response rate was 44% versus 6%, respectively. Anxiety ratings also decreased significantly more with ketamine. Patients showed significant improvement in depressive symptoms at 24 hours after ketamine compared to placebo. Intranasal ketamine was well tolerated with minimal psychotomimetic or dissociative effects and was not associated with clinically significant changes in hemodynamic parameters like blood pressure.

Intranasal ketamine represents a promising advance in treatment-resistant depression (TRD) therapeutics. Most studies report a duration of response up to 7 days and remission up to 3-5 days after a single dose. “Most adverse events … subsided spontaneously by 60 to 90 minutes post dose,” said Vanina Popova, MD. In addition, “there was no pushback” to the nasal delivery system. “The route of administration was well received, and it was certainly more convenient than intravenous administration,” she said.

Intranasal ketamine is not commercially available, but the clinical use of intranasal ketamine is increasing internationally. Research has concluded that the drug formulation, the delivery device, the technique and individual patient factors play an important role in tolerability and efficacy when using intranasal ketamine for Treatment Resistant Depression.

Intranasal ketamine has been reported in studies to help depressed patients who have not responded to conventional therapy with minimal side effects. Ask our pharmacist for more information about compounded intranasal ketamine. We customize medications to meet each patient’s specific needs.

NOVA Health Recovery Ketamine Treatment Center | 703-844-0184 | Alexandria, Va 22306

References:
Depress Anxiety. 2016 Aug;33(8):698-710. 
Gen Hosp Psychiatry. 2015;37(2):178–184. 
J Clin Psychiatry. 2015 May;76(5):e628-31. 
Biol Psychiatry. 2014 Dec 15;76(12):970-6. 
American Psychiatric Association (APA) 2018. Abstracts P7-065 and P8-054, presented May 8, 2018.
Psychiatry Clin Neurosci. 2018 May 10. 
J Clin Psychiatry. 2017 Jun;78(6):e674-e677. 
CNS Drugs. 2018 May 7. [Epub ahead of print]
J Psychopharmacol. 2018 Apr;32(4):397-407.

Ketamine 25mg – 100 mg Nasal Spray

BACKGROUND: The N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist ketamine, delivered via an intravenous route, has shown rapid antidepressant effects in patients with treatment-resistant depression. The current study was designed to test the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of intranasal ketamine in patients with depression who had failed at least one prior antidepressant trial.
METHODS: In a randomized, double-blind, crossover study, 20 patients with major depression were randomly assigned, and 18 completed 2 treatment days with intranasal ketamine hydrochloride (50 mg) or saline solution. The primary efficacy outcome measure was change in depression severity 24 hours after ketamine or placebo, measured using the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale. Secondary outcomes included persistence of benefit, changes in self-reports of depression, changes in anxiety, and proportion of responders. Potential psychotomimetic, dissociative, hemodynamic, and general adverse effects associated with ketamine were also measured.
RESULTS: Patients showed significant improvement in depressive symptoms at 24 hours after ketamine compared to placebo (t = 4.39, p < .001; estimated mean Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale score difference of 7.6 ± 3.7; 95% confidence interval, 3.9-11.3). Response criteria were met by 8 of 18 patients (44%) 24 hours after ketamine administration compared with 1 of 18 (6%) after placebo (p = .033). Intranasal ketamine was well tolerated with minimal psychotomimetic or dissociative effects and was not associated with clinically significant changes in hemodynamic parameters.
CONCLUSIONS: This study provides the first controlled evidence for the rapid antidepressant effects of intranasal ketamine. Treatment was associated with minimal adverse effects. If replicated, these findings may lead to novel approaches to the pharmacologic treatment of patients with major depression

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